Posts Tagged ‘Pensions’

Andrew Kerrin

Welcome to our third Quarterly Update for 2019. We’ve only just said goodbye to British Summer Time, we thought we’d be saying hello to the post-Brexit era, but instead we’ll be wrapping tinsel around our polling cards as we head out to vote in the upcoming General Election. Anyone for a surprise Christmas gift?

You would be forgiven for thinking that there is no other news, and hoping that extensions, flextensions and even political tensions would melt away in the snows of winter … but regardless, the pensions world continues to turn and we’ve compiled our list of topical pension articles from the last quarter.

Inside you’ll find details of the new CMA requirements for trustees to engage with investment consultants and fiduciary managers and an update on your favourite subject (next to Brexit!) – GMP Equalisation. We also look at the ‘legacy’ that is RPI and the anticipated move to CPI. Should there be a professional trustee on every scheme? We look at both sides of the debate. And as if that’s not enough, we’ve got an investment market update, news from the Pension Scams Industry Group and PRAG, a summary of the TPR and PPF Report and Accounts and information on changes to Data Subject Access Requests (DSARs).   

You can’t vote for your favourite, but we do hope that you enjoy reading our take on the latest industry news.

Click on image above or this link to download.

Alan Collins

20 years in pensions

Last week, I passed through the ‘20 years in pensions’ landmark. Year 21 is as busy as ever, but I did find some time to pause for some reflection.

1999 was my first year in a ‘proper job’. It was the year when people waited to party like Prince predicted back in 1982. It was the year when businesses were fixated by the impending doom of the Millennium Bug, which after greater preparation, pretty much came to nothing (see GDPR). In 1999, Scotland had recently qualified for a major football tournament and suffered its first of many glorious failures in attempting to qualify for Euro 2000. Ah, the days of glorious failure instead of just plain old failure.

I started work in Towers Perrin’s North of England Office (St Albans!) and so my quest for the actuarial fellowship qualification commenced. In the financial world of 1999, the Bank of England base rate was 5.0% a year (no I haven’t missed the decimal point). Long-term interest rates were expected to average at 4.5% a year for the next 20 years.

So, if you were to borrow £1,000 for 20 years back in 1999, you would be expected to pay back £2,412 i.e. £1,412 of interest. Today, the amount to pay back would only be around £1,220 i.e. only £220 on interest of around 1% a year.

The late-90s pensions industry was adapting to the post-Maxwell world of the Pensions Act 1995 (PA95) and the soon to be forgotten Minimum Funding Requirement (MFR). Amongst a raft of legislation, PA95 introduced mandatory pension in payment increases and enshrined in law the protection of pension benefits built up in the past.

It was also a time-period when it was becoming clear that the actuarial profession had significantly underestimated life expectancy. This was (and still is) another significant factor in past pension promises costing more than had been expected.

My years in pensions have sped past, now finding my home at Spence for almost ten years now. Fellowship of the actuarial profession eventually came in 2006 and I have been proud to advise many pension scheme trustees as their Scheme Actuary since 2008. I have seen the sad, but inevitable, demise of final salary pension schemes for most members. As such, my job in the main involves helping trustees and sponsors deliver the past benefits that have been built up.

To end this reflection, I mused about the most significant turning points in the pensions industry over my time. Several came to mind, but I would plump for the introduction of full buyout solvency debts on sponsoring employers and the introduction of the Pension Protection Fund (PPF).

From what I recall, the introduction of full buyout debt sort of snuck up on sponsoring employers. Of course, the vast majority want to provide full pensions for all members. However, with the huge challenges and costs of pension schemes, how many would turn back the clock and wind-up schemes with lower obligations? Very many, I am sure.

The mere existence of the PPF is often cause for celebration and rightly so. In the fifteen years since it opened its doors, it has given shelter to around 250,000 members and undoubtedly provided them with a much better financial outcome than would otherwise have been the case. So, to the next 20 years.

What will happen? Don’t ask me, I’m an actuary!

David Davison

The more I read about defined benefit (DB) consolidation, the more it appears to have a key parallel to Brexit, namely: everyone seems to have a different expectation of the outcome.

The DWP’s White Paper “Protecting Defined Benefit Schemes” was published in March and followed up last year’s Green Paper with further proposals on the benefits of consolidation.

There are multiple consolidation options. Each will have a different impact and will be complicated to achieve.

The suggestion is that bigger is better. Having larger schemes reduces cost and improves governance. Interestingly, however, the 2017 Purple Book suggests that smaller schemes (i.e. those with less than 100 members) are on average better funded than those with more members.

So, in considering consolidation, what options are possible, what are their potential benefits and what might be the associated considerations?

Investment consolidation

The potential to consolidate investments seems relatively simple, can reduce costs and provide schemes with access to a greater level of investment choice.

Access to investment platforms can provide cost and administrative benefits even without wholesale changes to underlying governance or administration.

Governance consolidation

Consolidating governance, for example, in the form of sole ‘professional’ trusteeship also seems to present schemes with a straight-forward path to governance improvements and can be achieved without upheaval to the schemes’ delivery services.

Going beyond the above there is further potential, but the benefit improvements are much less certain based upon the specific circumstances of each scheme and employer.

Operational consolidation

There may be operational opportunities to merge key scheme services such as administration and actuarial.

It’s far from clear cut, however, that such a move will result in cost savings.

There is little evidence that the provision of services within a DB Master Trust are provided at a materially lower cost unless some form of benefit consolidation can be achieved.

In addition, the likely scheme time horizon will have a huge bearing on the cost effectiveness of any move given the inevitable set-up costs of a service change. If, for example, the time horizon to buyout is within 5-10 years then annual savings may not outweigh initial transition costs.

Any move to a DB Master Trust must be reviewed in terms of flexibility. Such a move will require a scheme to fit within the DB Master Trust model where any pricing improvements which can be achieved are done so via some form of standardisation.

The timing of valuations or the approach to administration may not be something that suits all schemes or employers.

What is the Master Trust approach to employer covenant, member communication and benefit options and is any approach outside the norm likely to incur additional costs which may negate any savings?

This will be an important initial consideration as in my experience these schemes are much easier to join than they are to exit.

Benefit consolidation

This is even more problematic.

Converting one scheme benefit basis to another has long been fraught with difficulty given that ultimately a guarantee will have to be provided that members will be no worse off.

This will undoubtedly result in up-front costs that again have to be considered against any savings which can be made in future.

There have been calls for Government to standardise benefits to make consolidation easier, but it remains to be seen how this can be achieved.

Ultimately a Scheme Actuary will have to sign-off any benefit conversion to confirm that the change does not detrimentally impact on members’ accrued benefits, which is far from an easy hurdle to get over.

It is also difficult to envisage how consolidation can happen for schemes with unequal funding levels, as trustees would surely seek a “levelling-up” of funding. This has been an issue which has undoubtedly slowed the pace of consolidation in Local Government Pension Schemes (LGPS).

There must also be a concern that close links to key personnel in a scheme sponsor who can provide valuable insight from an employer covenant and operational perspective could be lost through consolidation.

Are ‘Superfunds’ the answer?

There have been proposals that a middle way between own-scheme funding and buying-out with an insurer may be possible.

This would be via what have become known as ‘Superfunds’ which would consolidate scheme benefits from multiple schemes. The suggestion is that sponsors would benefit from lower costs than that required to fund a buyout.

Proponents have been quick to highlight that any transfer in to Superfunds would need to be fully assessed by Trustees as being in members’ interests and that any agreement is likely to result in accelerated employer contributions over those paid under a funding plan in order to gain access.

An initial entrant to the market has suggested that revised legislation is not required as their scheme is just the same as any other occupational pension scheme and could run under existing regulation.

This, however, differs from proposals put forward by the Pensions and Lifetime Savings Association (PLSA) where it was expected revisions to the regulatory framework would be required.

Clearly we are at a very early stage in terms of this potential solution and it is likely to evolve over the coming months. Undoubtedly questions remain over this approach, particularly around the break in the link to the sponsoring employer and therefore the strength of the employer debt security.

Industry unconvinced by consolidation

The Association of Consulting Actuaries’ Pensions Trends Survey 2017 suggested that only 16% of sponsors would consider consolidation and only 32% thought that potential cost savings were real.

That would seem to suggest there are real concerns about how successful any consolidation might be and a high level of scepticism that promised improvements can be achieved.

It is interesting that LGPS schemes where the benefit basis is the same have primarily gone for investment consolidation. This may well be a first step, but where funds have merged for delivery services the impact in the end-user experience has been patchy.

There are undoubtedly efficiencies and opportunities for improved investment and governance available through some form of consolidation, however, the extent will be very much based on individual circumstances and requirements.

Those in favour of much greater reform certainly have a lot of convincing to do.

This article originally appeared in CA Today on the ICAS website here – on the 19th May

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